Listen Live
Bowl of peanut butter and peanuts on table background. top view with copy space. Creamy peanut pasta in small bowl

Source: Mykola Sosiukin / Getty

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — If your child has a peanut allergy, you might soon be able to help them find relief in the form of a skin patch.

Dr. Kirsten Kloepfer, an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the IU School of Medicine, co-authored a study about the Viaskin Peanut Patch.  This treatment works slowly over time to desensitize allergic individuals, making their bodies more tolerant of peanut products.

Caramelized Chopped Peanuts for Dessert Topping

Source: Ika Rahma / Getty

You might be wondering how, exactly, this is possible.  The Indy Star reports that the patch exposes wearers to “small doses of peanut protein” through the skin.

Toddlers participating in a study wore a patch every day for one year, with some patches being placebos.

Peanut butter sandwiches or toasts on light table background.Breakfast. Vegetarian food. American cuisine top view vith copy space

Source: Mykola Sosiukin / Getty

By the end of the year, one third of the kids wearing the placebo patch were able to eat more peanuts than they had at the start of the year, compared to two thirds of the kids wearing the Viaskin patch.

There were some side effects – namely skin irritation.  One patient had an “anaphylactic response.” However, Dr. Kloepfer still thinks the patch will be a game-changer for kids with peanut allergies, as well as their family members.

The patch still needs to be approved for public use by the FDA.

Bowl of peanut butter and peanuts on table background. top view with copy space. Creamy peanut pasta in small bowl

Source: Mykola Sosiukin / Getty